Archive: October 28, 2008

1
Newly Released Securities and Exchange Commission Enforcement Manual (“Red Book”) Provides Guidance on Treatment of Electronic Information
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Court Declines to Require Plaintiff to Designate Specifically Confidential Portions of Documents during Discovery where Entire Document does not Rise to that Level

Newly Released Securities and Exchange Commission Enforcement Manual (“Red Book”) Provides Guidance on Treatment of Electronic Information

For the first time, the SEC has released its Enforcement Manual, also known as the "Red Book” to the public.  Although the manual is intended to provide guidance to members of the SEC’s Division of Enforcement, it is a valuable resource for anyone involved in a SEC investigation.

Several sections address the topic of electronic information.  For example, section 3.2.6.2, “Form of Production,” provides a detailed explanation of what is expected of those responding to an SEC subpoena, including a discussion of the SEC’s preference for electronic production.  Section 3.2.6.2.3, “Format for Electronic Production of Documents to the SEC,” provides even greater detail regarding the production of electronic information.  The manual also provides valuable guidance on privilege logs, bates stamping, records certifications and much more.

The full text of the Enforcement Manual is available here.
 

Court Declines to Require Plaintiff to Designate Specifically Confidential Portions of Documents during Discovery where Entire Document does not Rise to that Level

Containment Tech. Group, Inc. v. Am. Soc’y of Health Sys. Pharmacists, 2008 WL 4545310 (S.D. Ind. Oct. 10, 2008)

In this defamation case, the parties disagreed over the scope of a protective order sought by plaintiff prior to production of proprietary information, among other things.  The parties attempted to negotiate the terms of such an order, but could not agree on several issues, including whether only portions of documents should be designated as “confidential” if the entire document did not rise to that level.  Under the parties’ proposed terms, materials designated “confidential” would have automatically been sealed if filed with the court.

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